Month: January 2019

The Weather Outside is… Delightful?

It’s been quite the week of weather here in Colorado. It started in single digits and broke 60°F yesterday. We definitely are experiencing all the seasons this week!

To kick off the New Year, we’ve been paying particular attention to temperature. We enjoy looking over the day’s temperature changes using this site. Then we mark it down! Pip and I are each tracking the weather in our own ways.

I found this chart for Pip. Every night, before I go to bed, I place a line at the day’s high. In the morning, when he wakes up, he colors it in. It has started a lot of really fun conversations and learning experiences!

I have, ambitiously, started a weather blanket. So far I am really enjoying it! I may not make it all 365 days, but right now it’s a great way to unwind at the end of each day. And Pip loves checking in to see what color has been added!
Tara

Porch Swing Views: Bikes and Struggles

Today’s temperature has climbed to a gorgeous 64°F. As we left the co-working space we love, I promised the kids a picnic on the lawn and bike riding. I texted O on the way home to let him know the plan and he sweetly pulled out Pip’s bike.

Only to discover both tires were flat. Ug.

Thankfully we live ridiculously close to the library, where there is a bike fix-it station! We drove the two minutes up there to wait in quite the line for our turn. Apparently everyone had plans to enjoy the beautiful weather!

It struck me as interesting that some people would accuse us of not “doing” school today. But, in addition to music time at our co-working space, my kids were learning all day long. And pumping up the tires was just another learning experience. I showed them the parts of the bike. They helped me located the stem on each tire. We studied each tire to find the recommended PSI and then watched the dial as we pumping in the air to make sure we didn’t over inflate!

We returned home and I worked on some personal projects on the swing while the kids traded off between bikes. That is when the big lesson came. You see, Pip wants to learn to ride a two wheeler. And for any of us who can remember that long ago, that is sometimes a tough lesson. Today he became extremely frustrated with his seemingly minimal progress in this endeavor. He came up, rather defeated, to the porch where I was seated. We discussed frustration. What it feels like, what our brain might tell us and some options. He could stop for today. And that would be just fine. Or he could continue practicing. And that would be fine too. But only he could make the decision.

Hear me loud and clear. Every bone in my mama body wanted to rescue him. I wanted to swoop in, save the day, change the plan and bring back rainbows and butterflies for this sweet boy.

But, as much as my heart wanted that, my brain knew better.

I know, from research and my career, that struggle is important. Crazy important. Struggle teaches really important things. Like confidence, problem solving, “smartS” (IQ), emotional IQ and grit. (read more here)

So, I reminded him of his options. I gave him words for his feelings. And I let him know he was accepted with either decision. But I didn’t save him. I didn’t tell him what to do. I kept my bum firmly planted on that porch swing.

Now, I would love to tell you he ran back to his bike, hopped on and rode off into the sunset. But this is the real world folks. He didn’t master the two-wheeler today. He might not master it tomorrow. But he did choose to get back on that bike and try a few more times. And my heart, silently, bust wide open.

Just my view from the front porch swing.

Tara

Gameschool: Outfoxed

Word has spread in the family – a perfect gift for us is always a game!

Children learn so many fantastic things through games. Beyond just turn taking, patience and problem solving. You can target history, geography, math, critical thinking and more! Gameschooling itself it a huge movement in the homeschool community for good reason.

One gift the kids received for Christmas (thanks Nana!) was Outfoxed. Now, we are huge Gamewright fans, so we knew this one was going to be awesome.

Getting through the directions was a tad cumbersome, I’m not going to lie. But our little family of four figured it out and had a blast. Even though we lost!

Yep, “we” lost. It’s a fantastic cooperative game where it is players against the game. I love these games for my clients who a struggle with competition and/or anxiety. And cooperative games make it easy for the 2 year old to play with the 5 year old in our home! While Pip played mostly independently whole exercising his problem solving skills, Liv enjoyed rolling and learning how to move around the board, even if she didn’t understand the critical thinking aspects yet!

The game reminds us of Clue mixed with Guess Who, but in a simplified cooperative way! One of the foxes has committed a crime and you have to figure out which one is guilty! You are given pictures of all your suspects and clues hidden around the board. All the clue relate to what the suspects are wearing. It’s really quite ingenious.

Our group loss was clearly on Pip’s mind. When I woke up, I walked into the family room. Pip had the whole game set up, ready and waiting for our rematch against the foxes! Haha!

Round two was much more successful! We weren’t Outfoxed in round two!
Tara

A Folksong Dilemma

Pip and Liv’s curriculum has them learning a new hymn and folksong every month. I make a Spotify playlist out of their songs and we keep building it over the year. We’ve learned “Cockles and Mussels” and “Green Grass Grows All Around” before switching to Christmas music for November and December.

But I continue to run into a dilemma. The amount of folksongs around the topic of death. “Cockles and Mussels” caught me off guard. It was recommended by their curriculum so, in a complete mom fail moment, I didn’t pre-listen.

Trust me.

I have not made that mistake again. But every month I am having to search for our own songs, as the curriculum list continues to discuss death! For example…

October: Freight Train by Elizabeth Cotten (1905)

When I’m dead and in my grave,
No more good times here I crave,
Place the stones at my head and feet,
Tell them all that I’ve gone to sleep.
Freight train, freight train, run so fast,
Freight train, freight train, run so fast,
Please don’t tell what train I’m on,
So they won’t know what route I’ve gone.

When I die, Lord, bury me deep,
Way down on old Chestnut street
Then I can hear old Number Nine
As she comes rolling by.
Freight train, freight train, run so fast,
Freight train, freight train, run so fast,
Please don’t tell what train I’m on,
So they won’t know what route I’ve gone.

Err… ummm… Pass.

January: Minstrel Boy

The minstrel boy to the war is gone
In the ranks of death you’ll find him
His father’s sword he hath girded on
And his wild harp slung behind him
“Land of Song!” cried the warrior bard
“Tho’ all the world betrays thee
One sword, at least, thy rights shall guard
One faithful harp shall praise thee!”

The Minstrel fell! But the foeman’s chains
Could not bring that proud soul under
The harp he lov’d ne’er spoke again
For he tore its chords asunder
And said “No chains shall sully thee
Thou soul of love and brav’ry!
Thy songs were made for the pure and free
They shall never sound in slavery!

Seriously. No. Let’s skip ahead to February?

February: Walk That Lonesome Valley by Mississippi John Hurt (1924)

You got to walk, that lonesome valley.
Well, you got to walk it for yourself.
Ain’t nobody here, can walk it for you.
You got to walk that valley for yourself.

My mother had to walk that lonesome valley.
Well, she had to walk it for herself.
Cause nobody here could walk it for her.
Yeah she had to walk that valley for herself.

Oh yes, you got to walk that lonesome valley.
Well, you got to walk it for yourself.
Cause nobody here can walk it for you.
You got walk that valley for yourself.

My father had to walk that lonesome valley.
He had to walk it for his-self.
Cause nobody here could walk it for him.
He had to walk it for his-self.

Oh, Jesus had to walk that lonesome valley.
He had to walk it for his-self.
Cause nobody here could walk it for him.
He had to walk that valley for his-self.

Oh yes you got to walk that lonesome valley.
Well, you got to walk it for yourself.
Yes nobody here can walk it for you.
You got to walk that valley for yourself.

Oh my word. I. Just. Can’t.

So we’ll be learning An Acre of Land for January. I can explain that one clearly!

I am totally open to Folksong recommendations… without macabre themes, please!

 Tara

Reading Together: Why, What and What is Next?

Reading aloud is important in our home. I have vivid memories of my mom reading aloud to me as a child. She would come into my room in the evening and we’d curl up together reading Madeline L’Engle books such as A Wrinkle in Time. I have read to my own children since they were babies and in the past 2 years we’ve made the switch to chapter books. Pip and Liv love listening to chapter books, whether audiobooks in the car or physical books I’ve found on family member’s shelves or in lovely used bookstores. I recently posted our first audiobook series for 2019 on my social media and was flooded with questions. So I’ve decided to answer some of them below!

Why Do You Read Aloud?

Research has shown us, time and time again, that reading is vital to child development. Reading aloud to a child exposes them to diverse vocabulary, develops imagination and teaches listening skills. And it helps develop lifelong readers! Even once your child has begun to read, it is important to keep reading aloud with them by selecting books beyond their reading level but tied to their interests. By reading to Pip and Liv, we are modeling reading for enjoyment while demonstrating how to read. Left to right, top to bottom, inflection, character voices and emotions like suspense, surprise and sadness!

What Books Do You Pick?

There are so many book lists out there. Some put out by libraries, authors, bloggers and more. The Read Aloud Revival has recently received a lot of press and I very much appreciate her exposing parents to the idea of reading to their children. While I have some hesitations with her book list, it is a fantastic place to start for many families.

There are some specific things I look for when selecting chapter books to read with our children. While it is hard to simplify it, here are the first three things I look into…

  1. Not Twaddle: Twaddle is “trivial or foolish speech or writings”. We look for books that teach character, written with “literary power” and expect intelligence from our children. A great explanation of this can be found here.
  2. Simple Drawings: Ask my poor husband, I will spend hours in a used book store flipping through multiple copies of the same book. I’ll request different versions of the same book through the library system and return most of them to the cart without ever checking them out. I don’t want a book that provides brightly colored pictures to my children. This takes away from their imagination’s job! I love a book with simple pen drawings in black and white. Enough to help them if they’ve never seen the story’s topic, but which leaves out most of the image for their minds to fill in.
  3. Engaging: There is a good chance that, if the story bores me, it will also bore my children. I look for books that we all find interesting. Not only does this keep my children loving our read aloud times, but it makes me more prone to pick the book up and excitedly start the next chapter.

What Did You Read in 2018?

We had so much fun reading chapter books in 2018. Many we were gifted by my husband’s aunts and some came from his grandma. They were older book with that wonderful “book smell” and simple line drawings. Here is a list of the ones we completed before the stroke of midnight last night:

2018 Reading List for Pip and Liv

  1. A Wrinkle in Time by Madeline L’Engle
  2. Stuart Little by E.B. White
  3. The Francis Collection by Russell Hoban
  4. A Bear Called Paddington by Michael Bond
  5. Winnie-The-Pooh by A.A. Milne
  6. The House at Pooh Corner by A.A. Milne
  7. Return to the Hundred Acre Wood by David Benedictus
  8. The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum
  9. The Marvelous Land of Oz by L. Frank Baum

What Are You Reading in 2019?

Pip and I talked about a new reading goal for 2019. We had set our goal for 10 in 2018 and just missed it. Failure is ok in our house, we actually celebrate it! We love learning from our failures and talking about them openly. Despite our shortcoming this year, we decided to aim a little higher for 2019. We are going to try for 12 books this coming year! We are wrapping up a few from last year still while making a “wish list” for 2019. There are more than 12 books on the list because, well.. we like options!

2019 Reading List for Pip and Liv

  1. The Trumpet of the Swan by E.B. White (started in 2018!)
  2. Mary Poppins by P.L. Travers
    1. Mary Poppins Comes Back
    2. Mary Poppins Opens the Door
    3. Mary Poppins in the Park
    4. Mary Poppins in Cherry Tree Lane
    5. Mary Poppins and the House Next Door
  3. Charlotte’s Web by E.B. White
  4. Burgess Animal Stories by Thornton Burgess (started 2018, a huge series!)
  5. Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame
  6. My Father’s Dragon by Ruth Stiles Gannett
  7. Velveteen Rabbit by Margery Williams
  8. Ozma of Oz by L. Frank Baum
    1. We plan to continue through this series – there are 14 Oz stories by Baum, another 26 put out by other authors and even more “related works”
  9. The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe by C.S, Lewis

Let us know if you are reading these too – my children love to talk books with their friends!

Tara