Liam was a c-section baby because he was transverse breech. That has a lasting impact on a lot of the decisions I make for him on a daily basis. Many people have no idea what transverse breech means, and thus don’t understand my explanations when I say we “can’t” do something, or I have to adapt milestone expectations for him. So, here is a little explanation.

Transverse breech: In a Transverse Lie the baby is lying sideways. The head is on one of the mother’s sides and the bottom is on the other.

A picture is available via that link to help you understand. In Liam’s case, he was on his back, with his feet over his head, up under my ribs.  The real impact was apparent when he was born…

breechlegs
Blacked out to protect the innocent 😉

 

Yep, those are his feet, up over his head! It took forever for them to come down. The doctors explained to us the need for constant monitoring and that we need to be aware his leg move differently that other babies. The biggest concern is possible hip dysplasia in the future. Each doctor appointment always includes a hip check. This involved flipping him onto his stomach, buck naked, and looking at his leg length and creases. They want to see both legs the same length (for obvious reasons) and that all the creases line up. It’s quite interesting actually! All of the creases and folds down a baby’s thighs should be symmetrical – his are for right now!

Hi legs have been something I’ve constantly needed to brainstorm, especially because I *LOVE* babywearing.  He can’t sit in some baby carriers the same way as other babies, he doesn’t fit into “infant inserts” the way others do and he struggles to get a good “seat” with his legs splayed. But it has its benefits! For example, he has easily rolled onto his side since birth. When your legs hang out straight and up, you “tip” easily! Haha!

<3 Tara

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